Home / Why Valis Works: Ingredients

CDP-Choline + Acetyl-L-Carnitine

Acetylcholine Production

Supplementing with CDP-Choline and Acetyl-L-Carnitine helps boost your brains Acetylcholine levels to increase cognition, increases brain energy, increases brain blood flow, and improves learning and memory.

For the professional gamer, this means quick thinking and mental processing, as well as better memory consolidation and retrieval for more effective practice sessions.

Huperzine A

Acetylcholine Booster

Huperzine A helps block the effect of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase to prevent the breakdown of Acetylcholine which increases its availability. Acetylcholine is critical for memories formation, reasoning, concentration, cognition, and neuroplasticity. [6]

L-Tyrosine

Performance Under Stress and Memory

L-Tyrosine is an important building block of Dopamine.

Increased dopamine levels enhances working memory and decision making in the prefrontal cortex.

Clinical studies show that L-Tyrosine improves memory and quick thinking while under acute stress like during gameplay. [4]

Ginseng

Reaction Speed and Mental Energy

A study of Panax Ginseng on reaction time revealed a 20 millisecond improvement on reaction time. [2]

Ginseng can significantly reduce the mental fatigue [1] associated with gaming and boost mood. [3]

Caffeine + L-Theanine

Relaxed Alertness, Reaction, Mood

The L-Theanine reduces the negative physical effects of caffeine without reducing the positive mental effects like alertness, reaction time, decision speed and mood lift. [8]

It also while prompts a non-drowsy relaxed mental state by blocking glutamic acid to the glutamate receptors. [7]

Taurine

Stimuli Filtering

Taurine works by calming the brain during periods of excessive neuron like gaming by interacting with your GABA receptors, located in the Thalamus.

Taurine works to help you process incoming data more efficiently leading to better and faster decisions.

Phosphatidylserine (PS)

Memory Attention, Motivation, Stress Decrease

PS is one of the most effective memory boosters we know of. Many clinical trials with PS have shown improvements in working- and long-term memory, recall, logic and even vision.

Attention span, motivation, socialization, and initiative all increased when using Phosphatidylserine as a nootropic.

PS is arguably one of the most effective gaming nootropics we have available today, plus it keeps our brain cells healthy.

Vitamin B: 3, 6, & 12

Total Energy and Nootropic Support

Each of the B-Vitamins contributes uniquely to the synthesis of all the major neurotransmitters, creation of ATP to fuel mitochondria, the myelin sheath protecting axons, brain cell signaling, receptor density, reducing inflammation, and more.

These B-Vitamines serve to enhance the effects of all ingredients.

DMAE

Energy and Focus

It’s so powerful that it was tested against Ritalin in a study in 1974 and held its weight. DMAE had about the same effectiveness as Ritalin in ADHD therapy. [9]

Rhodiola Root

Learning and Focus

Research shows Rhodiola Rosea can increase attention to detail-oriented tasks by improving concentration over a prolonged period.

Clinical studies show that most people experience the full benefits of Rhodiola Rosea from 30 – 40 days of consistent, daily use. This is the kind of supplement that is best if used every day.

 

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Notes:

  • The amounts of each ingredient included in Valis reflect the effective dose in third-party clinical trials.
  • In a non-clinical study, subjects reported significant improvement to aim, and overall game awareness after taking Valis.

 

Sources:

1. Reay J.L., Kennedy D.O., Scholey A.B. “Single doses of Panax ginseng (G115) reduce blood glucose levels and improve cognitive performance during sustained mental activity.” Journal of Psychopharmacology. 2005 Jul;19(4):357-65. (source)

2. Yeo HB, Yoon HK, Lee HJ, Kang SG, Jung KY, Kim L (2012) Effects of Korean Red Ginseng on Cognitive and Motor Function: A Double-blind, Randomized, Placebo-controlled Trial. J Ginseng Res 36: 190–197. doi: 10.5142/jgr.2012.36.2.190 [PMC free article] [PubMed]

3. Choi K.T. “Botanical characteristics, pharmacological effects and medicinal components of Korean Panax ginseng C A Meyer.” Acta Pharmacologica Sinica. 2008 Sep;29(9):1109-18. (source)

4. Coull N.A., Watkins S.L., Aldous J.W., Warren L.K., Chrismas B.C., Dascombe B., Mauger A.R., Abt G., Taylor L. “Effect of tyrosine ingestion on cognitive and physical performance utilising an intermittent soccer performance test (iSPT) in a warm environment.” European Journal of Applied Physiology. 2015 Feb;115(2):373-86. (source)

5. Colzato L.S., Jongkees B.J., Sellaro R., Hommel B. “Working memory reloaded: tyrosine repletes updating in the N-back task.” Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience. 2013 Dec 16;7:200. (source)

6. Wang B.S., Wang H., Wei Z.H., Song Y.Y., Zhang L., Chen H.Z. “Efficacy and safety of natural acetylcholinesterase inhibitor huperzine A in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease: an updated meta-analysis.”Journal of Neural Transmission (Vienna). 2009 Apr;116(4):457-65. (source)

7. Yokogoshi H., Kobayashi M., Mochizuki M., Terashima T. “Effect of theanine, r-glutamylethylamide, on brain monoamines and striatal dopamine release in conscious rats.” Neurochemistry Research. 1998 May;23(5):667-73. (source)

8. Owen G.N., Parnell H., De Bruin E.A., Rycroft J.A. “The combined effects of L-theanine and caffeine on cognitive performance and mood.”Nutritional Neuroscience. 2008 Aug;11(4):193-8. (source)

9. Lewis JA, Young R. Deanol and methylphenidate in minimal brain dysfunction. Clin Pharmacol Ther. 1975 May;17(5):534-40. PubMed PMID: 1092513.